Social Media Use Increases Depression and Loneliness

PennToday

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Does It Matter Where You Go To College

TheAtlantic

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Businesses say Students Aren’t Mastering Basic Workplace Skills….

The Hechinger Report

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Preparing Students for Jobs 20 Years Out

The Warwick Advertiser

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College Student Mental Health Crisis

PsychologyToday

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Handling That Moment

GeorgiaTechAdmissions

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2017 Admissions Data

InsideHigherED

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A FEW WORDS…AND A HUG!

I LOVE Thanksgiving because it’s simple. The entire purpose is to bring family and friends together and provide a time to pause from our busy lives and breathe. Thanksgiving does not have the buildup of other holidays that become consumed with parties, shopping, music, and obligations. It does not demand presents or greeting cards or fill the skies with fireworks. “Just show up.” “Bring a side.” “It’s all good. We’ll see you when you get here.” Thanksgiving language is calm, easy, encouraging, optimistic, and unifying— all qualities that are too rare in our culture right now.

Importantly, Thanksgiving also has a few admission lessons to teach:

Just as with life, it is easy to be caught up in the frenzy of the college admission experience— especially in the fall of your senior year. By this point, you’ve likely taken a bunch of standardized tests (sorry about that, by the way). You have probably submitted a few applications and are now considering if or when you need to send in more. You may be waiting anxiously for December when many schools release EA or ED decisions. Forget about all of that this week. Enjoy the fire. Eat too much food. Take a long nap. Go see a movie. Read something for fun. Whatever it is, just make an effort to PAUSE and to breathe (seriously. Do that. Don’t keep reading until you’ve taken at least three long, full breaths).

Back with me? Okay. Sometime this week, I want you to go find your parents (ideally individually) and give them a huge hug. Tell them this: “Thank you. I love you.” Don’t worry about expounding–a hug and those five words will do. This is Thanksgiving after all. Simple is best. But if you are looking for some reasons, here are a few:

For driving me to all of those practices; for using a snot sucker to de-congest me when I was two; for paying for (insert instrument or sport of choice here) lessons– and making me stick with them; for always trying to make my life better; for the sacrifices of time and money I’ve never known about (and for not viewing them as sacrifices); that I’m the last thought on your mind before you go to sleep (or the reason you wake up in the middle of the night); for all of those nights you sang me to sleep; for the copious loads of laundry and endless carpool lines and countless teacher conferences. Thank you for caring enough to argue with me, remind me, and continually check in. I know all of that comes from a place of love. 

This is your last Thanksgiving living full-time at home. Your parents love you more than you could everever possibly imagine. Five words and a hug. My friend and colleague, Brennan Barnard from the Derryfield School (NH) suggests that if you will be intentional to do this regularly everything else will take care of itself. “Thank you. I love you.”

Parents: This ThanksGIVING, GIVE.

No. I’m not suggesting a new sweater, a gift card, or another slice of pie (all welcomed, however). Instead, try this: “I trust you, and I’m proud of you.” The truth is that all “kids,” whether five, 15, or 50, long for their parents’ approval. We may find increasingly effective ways to hide or mask that desire, but invariably it is there. Sometimes in the college admission experience, your kids are seeing your love and concern as nagging. It causes friction when you ask repeated questions about deadlines, essays, and checklists, because they infer that as a lack of trust. I’m not telling you to completely step away, but step back this week. Hug your son or daughter and tell them, “I trust you.”

Don’t forget the only reason you are reading this is because your kid has worked incredibly hard to this point. They have taken lots of tough classes and done well. They have achieved outside the classroom. You are worried about admission decisions and financial aid packages because those things are imminent. What a great problem to have! (As someone who is just hoping my kids make it to middle school, I think you’ve already won). You are the only one who can say it, and they need it more than they’ll ever let on, so be sure you tell them this week, “I’m proud of you.”

THANKS. GIVE. GIVE THANKS.

Is any of this going to help you get into your first-choice school? Absolutely not. It’s not going to give you an edge on that merit scholarship or ensure an honors college admittance either. But a “great” or “successful” Thanksgiving is not about turkey or pie or football. Sure, those things are all nice, but they are not the heart and purpose of the holiday. The best Thanksgivings are about family, memories, and unity. At its core, so too is the college admission experience. “Getting in” is what people talk about but staying together is what they should be focused on.

Happy Thanksgiving! Enjoy those hugs.

GeorgiaTech



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College of the Week: McDaniel College

Academic Life

The student-faculty ratio at McDaniel College is 11:1, and the school has 67.2 percent of its classes with fewer than 20 students. The most popular majors at McDaniel College include: Parks, Recreation, Leisure, and Fitness Studies; Social Sciences; Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services; Psychology; and Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs. The average freshman retention rate, an indicator of student satisfaction, is 80 percent.

Cost & Financial Aid

At McDaniel College, 79 percent of full-time undergraduates receive some kind of need-based financial aid, and the average need-based scholarship or grant award 

The First Stop

The “First Stop” – Center for the First Year Experience, serves as a home base for students in their first year at McDaniel (first-year or first-year transfer). First Stop is the one-stop place for students to ask questions, get information, come in and say “hello” and get individual academic support. First Stop houses many components of the First Year Experience Program including the Peer Mentor program, First Year Seminar, Transfer Student Seminar, and new student orientation. The center also hosts workshops and meeting space for student programs (peer mentor programs, academic workshops, tutoring, First Year Council, Alpha Lambda Delta first year honor society, and more). As the First Stop expands and grows, it will provide additional opportunities for first-year students and families to connect to the community through this new center.

The First Stop is located in Hoover Library – 2nd floor. The center can be reached at: 410-857-2790 or firstyearteam@mcdaniel.edu

The most popular majors at McDaniel College include

Parks, Recreation, Leisure, and Fitness Studies; Social Sciences; Business, Management,Marketing, and Related Support Services;Psychology; and CommunicationJournalism, and Related Programs.

Top Reasons to Go to McDaniel College:

Reason #1 – The McDaniel Plan: As Flexible and Personal as YOU!

Reason #2 – Jan Term

Reason #3 – A Campus in Europe

Reason #4 – Money Magazine Ranks us a “Best College”

Reason #5 – One of 40 Colleges That Change Lives

Reason #6 – Community in Action

Reason #7 – Great Minds Come Together

Reason #8 – Win Big in the Centennial Conference

Reason #9 – Drive-in Tailgating- Unique to McDaniel

Reason #10 – There’s No Place Like the Hill

 https://www.mcdaniel.edu/

 

 

 

 

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Colleges That Bring In the Most Money from Applications

LendU

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